Why society should end victim blaming

Rape Culture is an environment in which rape is prevalent and in which sexual violence is normalized and excused in the media and popular culture.

Why society should end victim blaming

Previously, according to Canadian psychology professor Alexandra Rutherfordmost Americans assumed that rape, incest, and wife-beating rarely happened. Rape was defined as a crime of violence rather than a crime of sex as it had been before and the focus of rape shifted from desire for sexual pleasure to one of male domination, intimidation and a sense of control over gender norms.

Men, Women and Rapewas among the earliest to include first-person accounts of rape. Their authors intended to demonstrate that rape was a much more common crime than previously believed.

Williams traces the origin and first usage of the term "rape culture" [21] to the documentary film Rape Cultureproduced and directed by Margaret Lazarus and Renner Wunderlich for Cambridge Documentary Films.

She said that the film "takes credit for first defining the concept". The film explored how mass media and popular culture have perpetuated attitudes towards rape. Overview[ edit ] Feminists and gender activists conceptualize rape culture as a cultural environment that encourages gender violence, as well as perpetuating "rape myths", ranging from treating rape as merely "rough sex" to blaming the victim for inviting rape.

Rape Culture Pyramid by the 11th Principle: This infographic shows how rape culture builds from attitudes and words up to more severe behavior and violent actions. Michael Parenti believes that rape culture manifests through the acceptance of rapes as an everyday occurrence, and even a male prerogative.

It can be exacerbated by police apathy in handling rape cases, as well as victim blamingreluctance by authorities to go against patriarchial cultural norms, as well as fears of stigmatization suffered by rape victims and their families.

One explanation for the commonality of these myths is that only certain "bad" or "misbehaved" women are raped. This creates a category of women separated from the general population which encourages an "otherness" and reduces the idea that anyone is vulnerable to being raped.

This promotes the idea that the women who are raped were not raped for no reason, but that they deserved it.

If women believe that they were the cause of the rape, they may not go to authorities. This justifies and normalizes rape. Society creates these myths, scaring women before they are even raped.

Another reason for the acceptance of rape culture is the "just-world" hypothesis which claims that what happens to an individual in life is inherently tied to his or her actions and thus seen as justly deserved.

People who believe in this theory would also be more likely to believe women who are raped deserve it in some way. Finally, rape can be attributed to ways women were treated historically, as a factor used to oppress and create control over women.

First, any woman can be a rape victim regardless of age, size, shape, ethnicity, or status. Second, any man can be a rapist, not just "evil" or "mentally ill" men as thought in previous decades.

Finally, rape can occur in many different forms besides the stereotype of a violent, forceful rape done by a stranger.

Why society should end victim blaming

Now that rape could affect anyone, there would not be a proper way for men and women to avoid it. Some rape myths that were widely accepted on the basis of what kind of women would be raped were ideas that the victim was always "young, careless [and] beautiful" or they are "loose" women who "invite rape" by provoking men.

Blame - Wikipedia

Rape culture can manifest when third parties separate the sexual violence of select individuals and cast them off as deviant perverts rather than acknowledging that anyone can be capable of rape. In the s, rapists were often seen as mentally ill or deviants in society, and this view persisted among some people into the s.

Rape myths had suppressed the incidence of such events now known as "intimate partner rape" [31] or " marital rape "; at one time, the view was that women could never claim to be raped by a spouse. Rape cases in which both parties previously knew one another has been coined " acquaintance rape ", a term first coined by Robin Warshaw inand subsequently used by prominent academics such as Mary P.

For instance, sexist jokes may be told to foster disrespect for women and an accompanying disregard for their well-being, or a rape victim might be blamed for being raped because of how she dressed or acted.

O'Sullivan examines rape culture and fraternities, identifying the socialization and social roles that contribute to sexual aggression, and looks at "frat life" and brotherhood ideals of competition and camaraderie.

In these groups, sex is viewed by young men as a tool of gaining acceptance and bonding with fellow "brothers", as they engage in contests over sex with women.

Reasoning about rape and rape culture is also influenced by gender and heterosexuality norms, and therefore is also changing through time and place. Often, victims are dissuaded from reporting sexual assaults because of universities' and colleges' ambivalent reactions to rape reports and desire to suppress bad news.

Victims may not want to risk stigmatization and scrutiny in their lives, especially in campus society. Definitions of what counts as "rape" and who is treated as a "genuine victim" are constructed in discourse and practices that reflect the social, political, and cultural conditions of society.

For instance, rape victims may not be considered as such if it appears they did not struggle or put up a fight. Their emotional responses are observed and reported during investigations to aid in deciding if the victim is lying or not. Scholars argue that this connection is made due to a culture that shames all female sexuality that is not for the purpose of reproduction in a hetero-normative married household.

Why society should end victim blaming

It is defined as prejudicial, stereotyped or false beliefs about rape, rape victims, and rapists which can range from trivializing rape, denial of widespread rape, labeling an accuser as a liar, stating that most rape accusations are false, refusing to acknowledge the harm caused by some forms of sexual violence, or accepting that the victim "deserved it" because she was defined as a slut.By engaging in victim-blaming attitudes, society allows the abuser to perpetrate relationship abuse or sexual assault while avoiding accountability for those actions.

Where Does it Come From? In order to stop victim blaming, it is helpful to understand why people do it in the first place. Rape Culture, Victim Blaming, and The Facts What is Rape Culture?

If the survivor knows that you or society blames her for the abuse, s/he will not feel safe or comfortable coming forward and talking to you. Victim-blaming attitudes also reinforce what the abuser has been saying all along; that it is the victim’s fault this is happening.

Obviously, they're also women's issues, so I appreciate that, but calling gender violence a women's issue is part of the problem, for a number of reasons. And God left us not without warning of these Cainites. So the House of Israel shall know that I AM the Lord their God from that day and forward. And the heathen shall know that the House of Israel [the Jews] went into captivity for their iniquity: because they trespassed against me, therefore hid I my face from them, and gave them into the hand of their enemies. You wouldn't know it by looking at her but, according to her mother, Sandra Lobaina was a biter. “I bit her," said Lobaina, smiling, when asked to explain why her mother didn't breastfeed her.

met the man who said those words while working as a bartender in the Ozark Mountains of northwest Arkansas. It was a one-street town in Benton County. Why Do People Blame Rape Victims? On The Vicious Cycle Of Victim-Blaming — And What We Can Do To Break It.

Are these victims simply internalizing society’s judgments, or do they have more. Why women leave men they love – What every man needs to know. There are some truths that I strive to preach, for lack of a better word, in today's information-culture wars propagated in our corrupt mainstream media.

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